Kanzashi Flower Pincushion

Good afternoon. I entered this pincushion with Kanzashi flower top (tools and instructions from Gina B Silkworks) into the Create and Craft Gallery and to my delight I won Crafter of the Month. How wonderful is that. I got a voucher for £20 which didn’t take me long to spend. I bought some yummy Tilda fabric that I had been eyeing up for a while.

AW Kanzashi Pincushion 2

AW Kanzashi Pincushion

Materials:

  • 100% cotton fabrics (mixed red and white – was from Create & Craft but now out of stock)
  • Recycled old button, tapestry wool and metallic thread (to make wrapped button)
  • Small plain button (for the base)
  • Narrow ribbon (gold satin) and faux gem (gold)
  • Toy stuffing
  • Bradawl (sharp ‘pointy tool’) and tapestry needle (to attach button)
  • Kanzashi Project Card Pack
  • Kanzashi Hanabira Ruler , Rotary Cutter and Cutting Mat (optional for cutting small fabric strips and squares)
  • Kanzashi Flower Making Tool Kit (optional: Gluing Table, Glue Spreader, Turntable and Drying Station)
  • Kanzashi Petal Holders (optional: includes Petal Holder and Medium Drying Table)
  • Kanzashi Starch Adhesive
  • PVA glue (clear drying) and GemTac glue (for gluing gems to fabric)
  • Tweezers (for holding and manipulating petals)
  • Needle and thread plus sewing machine (optional – could stitch by hand)

How it was made:

  1. Four 3 ½ inch squares were cut from the cotton. Two pieces were sewn right sides together to make each cushion pad using a ¼ inch seam, leaving a small gap for turning. The cushions were turned out through the gap, stuffed and the gap hand stitched to finish.
  2. The wrapped button was created by wrapping an old plastic button with wool and then weaving with metallic thread. I made this one a while ago using instructions from Gina’s Button Making Workshop Manual. A brilliant book covering thread wrapped buttons, ring buttons, knot buttons and embroidered buttons. Narrow ribbon was thread through and tied to the back of the button. A bradawl was used to push a hole through the pincushion stack and the ribbon passed through with a tapestry needle. A small plain button was used on the base and the ribbon passed through the holes and tied tightly to indent the cushion shape.
  3. I used the instructions from Gina’s pattern card pack to make the Kanzashi Flower. I adapted the Maple Leaf Pattern and made 8 sets of petals using the pointed petal folding method. I used 30mm fabric squares for the outer patterned petals and 25mm squares for the inner plain red petals. I used the Hanabira ruler, rotary cutter and self healing cutting mat to cut the squares. These are not essential (you could use scissors) but if you like this craft these are definitely worth getting as they make cutting out the tiny squares so much easier and quicker. Tweezers really helped with the folding and manipulating. Kanzashi Starch is an essential to hold everything in place while constructing these.
  4. Although not essential, I found the Gluing Table, Petal Holder, Turntable and Drying Table really helpful too. You sit the petals in a layer of Kanzashi Glue while building more (stops them pinging back open). Petals are then glued in place with PVA onto a scrap of cotton on the Turntable. The built flower is then placed on the drying table.
  5. After drying the base cotton scrap was snipped close to the petals. Ribbon and the finished flower were glued to the button and a gem glued to the centre.
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Mixed Media Kanzashi Pom Pom Flower using Powertex

Today I am sharing another of my Kanzashi flower show samples created for Gina Barrett. To make the flowers I followed instructions for the Kanzashi Hydrangea (from Gina-B Silkworks). Basically tiny 15mm squares of silk are folded up to create little fabric petals. I used the Kanzashi starch adhesive to help hold the petals until ready to glue on and build the flowers. These little flowers are very fiddly so it’s not really the best project for an absolute beginner. A fair bit of swearing was involved here – tee hee hee.

 

AW Kanzashi Pom Pom 2

I used Powertex to create a mini vase and to coat a polystyrene ball with silk strips. Powertex is a fabric hardener which stiffens, glues, seals and protects natural fabrics and fibres – great for mixed media work.

I pushed a twisted wire (coated with florist tape) into the base of a small polystyrene ball – gluing with a little Powertex. I then covered the ball with strips of Powertex treated silk and dried before adding the tiny silk petals to build the flowers. I used fast grab PVA to glue them on, and Gemtac Glue to add the centre pearls.

AW Kanzashi Pom Pom 4

 

AW Kanzashi Pom Pom 1

I used larger silk squares to make sepals and a leaf on the stem.

The mini vase was made with the inner card tube from a kitchen foil roll. I built out the shape using pads of kitchen foil and wrapped with masking tape. I then coated it with Powertex and with strips of Powertex treated silk, and secured the wire into the top. I stuffed the middle of the tube with cotton wool to give stability and a bit of weight. I dry brushed over the texture using metallic acrylic paint and then covered with tiny flowers and faux gems.

I painted the little flowers on the vase with transparent Powertex using a small brush. The fine silk soaks it up easily. I left the leaf and pom pom flower untreated as I liked the contrast in feel and texture.

Materials:

  • Kanzashi Hydrangea Project Card (Kanzashi Project Card Pack)
  • Kanzashi Starch Adhesive
  • Transparent Powertex
  • Polystyrene ball (approx. 1.5 inch diameter)
  • Twisted copper wire wrapped with florist tape (to make stem)
  • Recycled sari silk strips (variegated vintage greens, pinks, browns)
  • Kitchen foil card inner tube
  • Kitchen foil and masking tape (for building out the pot shape)
  • Cotton wool (stuffing)
  • Faux gems and flat backed pearls (pink, blue, pearl, green)
  • Acrylic paint (metallic pink) and PVA glitter glue (green)
  • PVA glue (fast grab/tacky glue), Gemtac Glue (sticks glass, plastic or metal gems & beads to fabric)

Optional extras:

I used additional tools for making the flowers which are really helpful and make the process easier. They are not essential but you will probably want to get them if you decide that you like this craft.

  • Pack of straight and bent fine tweezers – great for manipulating fiddly items such as the small fabric squares while folding. I would say that tweezers of some sort are pretty essential – especially when making these tiny fiddly flowers.
  • Kanzashi Flower Making Tool Kit – contains a mini turntable, gluing table and spreader plus a small drying table. Great to have.
  • Petal Holders & Medium Drying Table – another useful kit if wanting to make several flowers. Contains 2 sets of petal holders (for small and larger petals) plus a bigger drying table (for more flowers).
  • Kanzashi Hanabira Ruler – another great tool for cutting small fabric squares. It can be used with a rotary cutter or to draw cutting lines if you are not comfortable with using a rotary cutter.
  • Small rotary cutter and self healing cutting mat. If you are new to using these please take great care as the rotary blade is razor sharp! Always engage the blade safety cover between every cut. Never cut towards yourself, and take care where you place your hands and fingers while cutting.

Adjustable Kanzashi Flower Ring Powertex Jewellery

Today I am sharing a pretty little adjustable Kanzashi flower ring created using fine printed cotton fabric which has been treated with Transparent Powertex to stiffen and protect it. Treating with Powertex adds strength and protects against dirt. Ideal for jewellery pieces.

There are lots of videos on YouTube showing Kanzashi flower making but most are using synthetic ribbons which are joined and sealed by melting. I used instructions from Gina-B Silkworks (this was a sample for her recent show on Create & Craft TV). Gina’s method is the traditional Japanese way using natural fabrics (silk or cotton). Being natural fibres these little flowers are simply ideal for treating with Powertex. Ready-made silk flowers could work very well too.

 

AW Kanzashi Ring 6

Really pretty and comfortable to wear (sorry that my hands are older crafters hands and not modelling quality – tee hee).

 

AW Kanzashi Ring 5

The ring is adjustable so easy fitting.

 

AW Kanzashi Ring 2

I coloured the back to match the wire colour. You can also see the adjustable ring form more easily in this pic – the backing and flower being secured to one of the flat wire coils.

 

Note: One thing to consider when using transparent Powertex is how it will affect the colour of the fabric. It will considerably darken many fabrics, giving them the appearance of their colour when wet. Always test out a spare scrap first so as not to be disappointed. The printed cotton that I used here changed very little in colour so I was really pleased with the result.

 

Tools and Materials:

Optional extras:

I used additional tools for making the flowers which are really helpful and make the process easier. They are not essential but you will probably want to get them if you decide that you like this craft.

  • Pack of straight and bent fine tweezers – great for manipulating fiddly items such as the small fabric squares while folding, and for placing the petals. I would say that tweezers of some sort are pretty essential unless you have really nimble fingers.
  • Kanzashi Flower Making Tool Kit – contains a mini turntable, gluing table and spreader plus a small drying table. Great to have.
  • Petal Holders & Medium Drying Table – another useful kit if wanting to make several flowers. Cotains 2 sets of petal holders (for small and larger petals) plus a bigger drying table (for more flowers).

How it was made:

AW Kanzashi

AW Kanzashi 2

My Kanzashi flower makes using the starter kit. I used the 7 petal rainbow one for the ring.

  1. I used the in Gina’s starter kit to make the seven petal rainbow flower. Basically little fabric squares are folded to make petals. The raw edges of the petals are then placed in thick Kanzashi starch to hold their shape while making up all the petals and building the flower. The petals are then glued to a base piece of cotton using PVA glue and left to dry overnight. Excess fabric on the base is then snipped away. I glued a small metal brad into the centre with Gemtac glue. Sorry that I am unable to give full instructions here for the flower as the specifics of this flower design belong to Gina.
  2. To make the adjustable ring I wrapped the wire around a ring mandrel and tapped the wire lightly with the hammer to work harden the ring structure. A nylon hammer helps protect against stripping off the coloured coating.
  3. I trimmed the wire and made a small curl on one side using the round nosed pliers. On the other side I made a larger curl, big enough to sit the flower onto the front and the wooden cabochon onto the back. I worked hardened and slightly flattened the wire curls using the hammer and steel block.
  4. I added a coat of clear Powertex to the back/base of the flower and wooden cabochon and left until touch dry. I then added another coat of Powertex (as a glue) and used Powertex Easy Structure to fill the voids in the wire curl, attaching the wooden cabochon to the back and flower to the front of the larger wire curl, and left it to cure overnight. The Easy Structure paste makes a nice solid bridge holding everything securely onto the back and front of the wire curl. A little Stone Art Clay would also work. Note: If you don’t have a suitable wooden cabochon a thick card/board or MDF shape could be substituted. I would advise an absorbent natural material for a strong bond with the Powertex. It also needs to be smooth so as not to scratch or irritate the skin when wearing.
  5. I then painted the cabochon and flower with Transparent Powertex, working it well into the fabric flower and crevices with a brush. Tip: If you find that you have big blobs or pools of Powertex use a piece of cotton rag to lightly dab and mop up the excess, or it can dry giving shiny blobby areas which will spoil the natural look and texture of the fabric flower. Leave to dry.
  6. Finally I painted the back of my cabochon attachment and flower base using Starlight acrylic paint. The colour match was simply perfect for the metallic pink wire that I used. If you are using copper, silver or gold plated wires you could paint with Colortricx pigment and Easy Varnish instead (to coordinate with your wire).

Powertex treatment has made this delicate fabric flower ring much more robust and protected against dirt – a more functional piece of jewellery. For further protection and full waterproofing you could add a final coat of Easy Varnish.

A sneaky peek of some of my samples for Gina-B Silkworks

Good afternoon. Here is a sneaky peek at some of my samples created for the show on Create & Craft TV tomorrow at 9am (Freeview Channel 23 – or watch live online from their website).

 

I will share more samples plus details of materials and instructions used soon.

 

Gina will be bringing fabulous Kanzashi flower kits as well as some Japanese techniques for creating  Yubinuki and Hashikazari.

 

AW Giant Yubinuki

 

I super enlarged the Japanese thimble design (Yubinuki design) to make a trinket box.

 

AW Kanzashi

 

Designs with Kanzashi Flowers

 

AW more Kanzashi

 

Photography courtesy of Gina Barrett.

Teneriffe Lace TV show samples for Gina-B Silkworks

Good afternoon. Here is a quick peek at my samples for the Teneriffe Lace show on Create & Craft today at 5pm. Freeview Channel 23 (UK) or watch online from the website (they keep videos online for a week if you miss it).

 

AW Lace pincushion 1

AW Lace pincushion 2

Clover Motif worked on Loom 1 – from Total Trimmings book 1 (Teneriffe Lace)

 

AW Lace xmas card 3

Christmas Motif – worked on Loom 1

 

AW Oriental lace canvas

Mixed media canvas – Large and small circular lace motifs from Total Trimmings book – Loom 1. The butterfly was one of my experiments on Loom 3.

I will blog more details soon.

My first set of samples for the Tattered Lace Christmas Shows

Hi all – I can reveal my first set of samples for the Christmas Cuties 4 day deal on Create & Craft TV. I hope that you like them. I will blog some instructions for you over the next few days.

Penguin place setting

Christmas Party place setting.

Penguin Rocker

Penguin rocker card.

A few with the lovely Twinkle die set:

Not really featured in the shows but listed in the show products at a sale price, A lovely die set.

Twinkle Card 1

Christmas card – I die cut the frame in wax paper and ironed onto stamping card to transfer the wax, then spritzed with inks to create this one.

Twinkle Card 2

I snipped into the frame to create four corners, mounted onto black card and coloured with glitter pens.

Twinkle Love Card

I combined with other dies from Tattered Lace to create this one.

Twinkle Tag

I cut the holly from foam to make a stamp. The little boots were created from waste pieces from the die cut.

Twinkle Scene Card

I snipped the frame and created an archway for a stamped scene (stamp from my stash).

Twinkle Bag

I treated some fabric with Terial Magic and cut the frame and flowers. This is fabulous stuff. I used an oil cloth effect fabric decoupage glue to glue on the frame and make a small make-up bag. It doesn’t have to be for Christmas.

More details to follow, Anne x.

Sneak Peek of samples created for the Tattered Lace 4 Day Deal Christmas Cuties Shows

I have been sitting on some exciting news – I am on the Tattered Lace Design Team – woohooooo!

Here is a sneak peek of my samples created for the 4 Day Deal Christmas Cuties Shows starting tomorrow at 8am on Create & Craft TV. Some fabulous cute dies and more lovely dies for Christmas projects.

I will be blogging full details and instructions for making over the next few days.

Penguin place setting sneak peakPenguin Rocker sneak peekTwinkle Bag sneak peekTwinkle Card 1 sneak peekTwinkle Card 2 sneal peekTwinkle Love Card sneak peekTwinkle Scene Card sneak peekTwinkle Tag sneak peek