More stamping delights from Chocolate Baroque

Good morning. This is the last of my guest posts for Chocolate Baroque this month. I had planned a completely different set of projects but just had designer block! Horrible when that happens, especially when working to a deadline. This happens to us all at times, particularly this year with all the added stresses.

After several days of wasted effort I just stopped working on my original plan, went away from my desk and tried to clear my head. I then went back and decided to just ‘go for it’ – no plan, no nothing. I just picked up stamps and got started. Finally ideas started to flow – phew. I find that this usually works for me, although it is not always easy to do – ha ha.

I hope that you enjoy my offerings. Everyone take care and enjoy Christmas as best you can. Spring will soon be here and I am hopeful for far better times to come soon. Big hugs Anne xxx.

Blue and White Mandala

AW Blue White Madala

This one is a quick and easy make using the lovely mandala style stamp.

Materials Used:

  • 15cm square white card blank, decorative die cut circle in blue card and scrap white stamping card
  • Palm Fan Silhouette stamp (Chocolate Baroque)
  • Versamark Inkpad
  • Dark blue embossing powder (WOW Earthtone Blueberry)
  • White pen

How it was done

  1. Faux stitching was added around the die cut circle to frame it. It was glued to the card front with 3D foam for added depth.
  2. The Mandala was stamped and embossed with blue powder, cut out and glued to the card front with 3D foam.

Dazzling Butterfly

 

AW Dazzling Butterfly

Chocolate Baroque have so many wonderful butterfly stamps – love this one.

Materials used

How it was done

  1. A mix of the Distress Inks were used to blend the outer edges of the card blank (this mix closely matched my blue die cut circle).
  2. The blue card topper was stamped with Versamark and embossed with white powder.
  3. The butterfly was stamped with Memento, coloured with alcohol pens. It was then heat embossed with a layer of clear sparkly powder and cut out.
  4. Everything was stuck down and the card was finally finished with glitter glue and PVA pearls.

Hydrangea Card

 

AW Hydrangea 2

When pushed for time I will often use some ready printed papers in the background. They can also help with inspiration at times too.

Materials used

How it was done

  1. The background paper was trimmed and edged with black marker. The base texture was stamped with black Versafine.
  2. The main image was stamped with blue Versafine, the card trimmed to approx. 9 X 13cm and edged with black marker. The floral section was stamped again with black Versafine. The stem was extended by drawing with black pen and the image cut out.
  3. The topper was then spritzed with water and Brusho powder dropped onto the wet card. When dry the monochrome Hydrangea was glued on top, curling the edges up slightly for dimension.

Floral Thank You Card

AW Coneflower thank you

This one was a super quick make. Ideal if you have a last minute card to do.

Materials used

How it was done

  1. The watercolour card was spritzed with water and stamped using a mix of the Distress Inks. These bled out giving a lovely watercolour effect.
  2. When dry the image was overstamped with Versafine. Versafine was also used to stamp the border and sentiment.

Dreamy Elephant Card

AW Elephant Dreams

I love the Indian themed stamps from Chocolate Baroque – definitely amongst my faves. To save a bit of time I again used a pre-printed background paper.

Materials used

How it was done

  1. The sentiment and base texture was stamped and embossed with copper powder.
  2. The flowers were stamped with Versafine. The background was then edged and embossed using the embossing pen and copper powder.
  3. The elephant was stamped onto white card with Versamark and embossed with gold powder. The image was then coloured with pencils and pens and cut out. The elephant was lightly shaped and glued down with 3D glue gel for dimension.

 

 

Gina B Silkworks Button Making on Hochanda TV today

Looking forward to Gina’s button show on Hochanda TV today at 10am (Freeview channel 85 or can catch up and watch via the Hochanda.com website). So many gorgeous button making kits.

 

I have had a play with some of the latest kits.

AW Needle Pattern

AW Victorian Buttons

Brand new Plushwork kit out today – I love these little fluffy textural treasures.

AW Plushwork Buttons

AW Plushwork Buttons 2

 

 

Also beautiful stamp sets for embroidery.

AW Georgian Buttons

I have made some Georgian style buttons.

I made a few embroidered items with the Elizabethan inspired stamps too.

AW Embroidery Wreath 2

 

AW Floral Brooch 1

and some cute ladybird buttons.

AW Ladybird Buttons 1

 

Off to catch the show xxx.

Gerbera Delights

Hi everyone. I am delighted to be a guest designer for you this month. For my second set of projects I have had a play with the lovely new Gerbera and Friends stamps from Annabel. Love this set. Hope that these give you a few more ideas and fun playing with some of your stash.

I have also finally finished the last of my Christmas card batch making – phew. Why do I always leave them until the last minute! Ha ha.

Lots of hugs, Anne.

GERBERA AND FRIENDS

Materials List

  • Stamp sets (Chocolate Baroque): Gerbera and Friends (main images), Words to Dazzle & Sparkle (sentiments), Glorious (leaf stamp)
  • Card blanks and smooth card (sky blue, white or black)
  • Inkpads: Stazon (Jet Black), Versafine (Onyx Black), Distress Ink (Gathered Twigs), Versamark
  • Versamark embossing pen
  • Embossing powders: detail white and metallic gold
  • Mica powders: yellow gold, pink and purple
  • Water based inks: Turquoise, yellow, green, red and magenta (I used Spectrum Noir Aquatints)
  • Acrylic paint metallic pink (Starlight)
  • Acrylic mat medium (clear drying)
  • Colouring pencils (pink, green, yellow)
  • Alcohol in pens (pink, purple, yellow)
  • PVA pearls and Glossy Accents
  • Acetate and translucent shrink plastic
  • Decorative circle dies (Tonic)

Make a Wish Cards

I created a couple of cards using the lovely dandelion clocks. I remember as a child how we would blow the seeds from the flower heads whilst making a wish. Happy memories.

AW Make a wish

My card blank measured approx. 13 X 17.5cm. I trimmed my stamping card to 12 X 16.5cm and rounded off the corners.

I painted on the water based inks, blending them wet in wet (working from the top down). When dry I flicked with water and lifted out colour with tissue to add texture. I also applied a circle of water and lifted it out to create the moon.

The dandelions, sentiment and foreground texture were stamped with Versafine. I lifted out some of the colour from the seed head bases).

I also used Distress Ink to stamp more texture at the base and to blend around the card edges. Black alcohol ink pen was used to edge and frame the card before mounting.

AW Make a wish blue

My next card was more clean and simple. The card blank was 15cm square and the blue background mat was trimmed to 14.5cm.

I used dies to cut the decorative circle (approx. 14cm diameter) and circular centre (approx. 9cm). A white paper doily would also look good if you don’t have decorative dies.

The images were stamped with Versamark and embossed with white powder. I mounted with 3D foam for added dimension. Finally finished with PVA pearls.

Bright Gerbera Cards

I adore this huge Gerbera stamp and wanted to make something really bright and cheery.

AW Gerbera Bright

My card blank was 15cm square. I trimmed black card to 14.5cm to create the background mount, and white stamping card to 13.5cm.

The card was painted with the yellow, red and magenta inks, blending them outward from the centre. Versafine was used to stamp the images.

AW Gerbera Star

Oh that Gerbera!

Again I used a 15cm square card blank and trimmed a black mat to 14.5cm. The background texture was stamped with Versamark and yellow/gold mica brushed over with a soft brush. Excess mica was removed with a microfiber cloth. Versamark was then applied around the edges which were embossed with metallic gold powder.

The sentiment and leaves were stamped and embossed onto black card. An embossing pen was used to edge the sentiment plate.

The Gerbera was stamped onto acetate and shrink plastic using Stazon which were then cut out.

The back of the shrink plastic was coloured with alcohol pens before shrinking with a heat gun. Coloured pencil was used to enhance the colour on the front before covering with Glossy Accents.

The back of the acetate image was coloured with mica powders mixed with mat medium. When dry the back was then painted with the metallic acrylic.

The photo really doesn’t do justice to the shine and mica sparkle on the Gerbera. Love this one.

 

LAST OF MY CHRISTMAS MAKES

Materials List

How it was done (including my boo boo)

I love these collage panel style stamps for creating quick and easy batch makes – one stamp does all the work for you. I have stamped and coloured these but they would look equally good without colouring or perhaps stamped and embossed with a pretty metallic powder. I like to use a stamping platform for batch making as it makes it easy to line up and repeat stamp in a production line.

AW Christmas Rose 2 stage 4

Stamped with Majestic Blue Versafine and coloured with Distress Ink (Chipped Sapphire).

I just had to make a blue and white set. Those of you that know me will know that I love making these. However, I have been a little out of practice with my stamping and colouring this year and my first attempt was a flop – ha ha. I have shown my blooper as I thought it may be helpful if you have struggled with colouring.

AW Christmas Rose 1 trial

This was my first attempt – eeek! Initially I tried to colour with watercolour pen and attempted blending out with a damp brush. It wouldn’t work very well and my watercolour just sucked straight into the card. This really shows the importance of choosing the correct type of card for the techniques that you wish to use. For watercolouring you need a card that will hold the pigment without it bleeding out too much, but then release it again when water is applied to allow blending and shading. This brand of card used to work well but recent batches really have not worked as well so I suspect they have changed the ‘formulation’.

As my watercolour pens were not behaving well with my card I tried switching to Distress Ink. Applying to my mat, diluting out and picking up with a damp brush. Distress Inks are specifically formulated to stay wet longer and to blend more easily. It worked out much better on this card. The two flowers on the left were my quick trial with Chipped Sapphire Distress Ink.

Another mistake I made was to go in far too heavily with the colour. I was aiming for a softer colouring more suitable for the delicate flower petals. This is achieved by using a more diluted colour and gradually building up the layers and shading.

AW Christmas Rose 2 stage 1

This shows the first stage of Distress Ink colouring using very dilute ink.

AW Christmas Rose 2 stage 2

Deeper colour was then added to give shading. Working more heavily on the leaves and stems helped the delicate flowers to stand out more.

AW Christmas Rose 2 stage 3

The edges of the card were distressed (using the edge of my scissors) to give a soft textured border before mounting onto the card blank. Lastly sparkly glitter glue was added to the flower stamens and around the edges. Cannot have Christmas without at least a little bling.

AW Christmas Rose Pink 1

My next set were also coloured with Distress Inks. I went quite dark on the leaves to enhance the delicate flowers.

AW Christmas Rose Pink 2

I was pleased with the delicate vintage look.

AW Christmas Rose Alc Ink 1

Next I coloured with soft pastel coloured alcohol ink pens.

AW Christmas Rose Alc Ink 3

Again my first attempt at colouring this batch was not really what I wanted. I felt that the flowers were a bit too much, too Summery and had lost their delicacy. Despite this I mounted this one as good enough.

AW Christmas Rose Alc Ink 2

I was happier with this colouring for the wintery theme. Coloured pencil details (outlines, leaf & petal veins) were added in to enhance the soft colouring.

Glad to have finally finished my Christmas cards – now to get them all written up and posted.

I will be back again next week with some more stamping play x.

Teneriffe Lace Shawl created with Vandyke Border Loom from Gina B Silkworks

Tonight I am sharing a shawl embellished with Teneriffe Lace and block printing that I made ready for Gina’s Lace show on Hochanda TV tomorrow at mid day (29th Oct 2019 on Freeview Channel 85 or watch catch up online via their website).

AW Lace Shawl 32

Gina has a button show at 4pm too where she will be bringing lots of her fabby historical button making kits, books and DVDs. Both shows are a must to see if you love textile embellishments, trims and passementerie.

Materials:

  • Lime green crochet cotton no.3 (Delfino – Filo Di Scozia)
  • Lilac DMC Mouline Cotton (like a standard 6 strand embroidery floss but on a large spool)
  • Sewing thread and needle (lime green)
  • Lime green cotton triangular shawl (made from quilting cotton) with sides measuring approx. 1m (I overlocked the edges using matching thread to prevent fraying)
  • Teneriffe Lace Starter Kit Loom 3 (Gina B Silkworks)
  • Teneriffe Lace Vandyke Border Loom set (Gina B Silkworks)
  • Fabric glue (optional)
  • Laundry starch spray (optional)
  • Thick dense foam mat (such as provided with Gina’s Total Trimmings Table) or upholstery foam (optional if wanting to use pins for stretching the web)
  • Decorative Indian wooden printing block and foam printing mat (Colouricious). The one I chose from my stash was approx. 9.5cm square with space in the centre to add the lace floral motifs
  • Setacolor Opaque (Spring Green, Raspberry and Parma Violet) and Deka Perm (Opaque White) fabric paints
  • Kitchen sponge and paint tray
  • Iron

How to do it:

Gina’s loom kits provide general instructions for stretching the web, darning, reverse backstitch and knotting etc.

Note: The hardest part to get right is the Teneriffe Lace Knot which holds it all together. Get this wrong and your lace won’t hold together properly when you remove it from the loom. Should this happen, don’t despair, do what I did with my first lace attempts and glue it to a card or a mixed media canvas. Ha ha.

There is a great beginners video from Gina to help with this.

I spent quite some time developing the lace pattern by quite a lot of experimenting, undoing and redoing until I was happy with the result. Don’t be afraid to play. Gina has also provided some easy starter lace borders in the instructions so you could try these first and make up a couple of smaller projects first.

The Border Lace:

Whenever thread ends were tied and finished, or working threads joined with knots, I added a small dab of clear drying fabric glue for extra security. This is optional but I thought it would ensure no loosening of thread ends, particularly during lots of wear and washing etc.

AW Lace Shawl 1

Starting: I stretched the web on the Vandyke Border Loom leaving a long end at the start and keeping the ball in place on the left hand side (to avoid making joins as the border is continued). Here I have wrapped the thread end a couple of times around the loom end to hold the tension in place.

I made an angle on the first end so that it would continue on the shape of the shawl corner. The pins were placed on a diagonal and threads held together by K 2e (knotting 2 threads to hold).

Note: When working some of the bigger projects I prefer to use pins to hold the web rather than lacing with waste thread. It is a little less portable in this method but much quicker to stretch the web.

AW Lace Shawl 2

Row 1: I worked a row of sc (scalloped edge by k 2e to create small anchored loops) along the bottom edge, joining in a new thread as required.

AW Lace Shawl 3

Row 2: Next I worked a row of K 2e (keeping the pairs of threads in alignment with the first bottom row of knots) along the centre of the lace band.

Note: For each row I joined a new length of yarn. Once worked this was loosely wrapped and tied (to prevent tangling) and kept on the left hand side, ready to work the next section of the lace as the lace is moved on along the loom.

Row 3: I then worked a row of sc along the top edge. See how the threads now separate to give a lacy effect. Again I joined a new thread for this row.

AW Lace Shawl 4

Row 4: A row of k 4e (4 threads knotted together such that the groups of knotted threads aligned with the peaks and troughs of the top edge) was worked in the centre of the bottom straight border section. This opened out the threads into a pretty lace design.

Row 5: A row of *k 2e (x3), k 4e (x1), K 2e (x3)* was repeated along the top border. The 2e knots were worked just below the knots on the sc edge and the 4e knots were worked about half way down the space. This created a nice section with 7 little spaces, ideal for darning (weaving) in the next row.

AW Lace Shawl 5

Row 6: Next I joined in the lilac thread. To start I knotted just under the threads of the previous row until reaching the centre of the 7 space section.

AW Lace Shawl 6

Row 6 continued: The 7 space section was progressively darned (pdt) for 8 rounds. The thread was taken under 1, over 2, under 2, over 1, under 1, then over 2 and under 1 to complete the first round (starting at the top left hand side single thread). As the rounds are worked the weave goes in the opposing over/under direction naturally (as there is an odd number of thread groups/spaces).

When 8 rounds were complete the thread was taken under the first thread bar again before moving along to the left with knotting.

Full row 6 repeat: *k 2e (x3), k 4e (x1), pdt (x8) in the round, u 1e, K 2e (x3)* repeated along the top border.

These 6 rows form the pattern repeat for the straight border sections. The straight knotting rows are quite quick to work but the darning does take a little longer. Well worth it though I think.

AW Lace Shawl 7

The lace was then removed from the loom ready to work the next section.

AW Lace Shawl 8

The first few loops were replaced onto the end of the loom and the next section of web was stretched ready to work. Here you can see the ball kept in place (keeping the web continuous without thread joins). The working threads were loosely tied for each row (keeping them separate, tying in a new length as required).

AW Lace Shawl 9

The next section of lace was then worked as given above.

AW Lace Shawl 10

Again the lace was moved along as each section was completed. I was so excited to see it grow.

AW Lace Shawl 11

I had calculated that I would need 25 little peaks to fit along the sides of my scarf before needing to turn the corner (the space between each peak being approx. 4cm and the sides of my scarf being approx. 1m).

Note: The lace does pull in slightly when removed from the loom (the amount will vary depending on stitches used). Bear this in mind and check that the length of your lace is OK before turning the corner (particularly on a large project).

AW Lace Shawl 12

As with the straight border I pinned the first few loops of lace onto the corner loom and laid out the pins ready to stretch the web.

AW Lace Shawl 13

I stretched the web on the first half of the corner then spent some time thinking – how was I to make a corner pattern that would continue the straight sections nicely? This took me some time – ha ha.

AW Lace Shawl 14

The threads on the corner diagonal of the web need to be interlocked. I therefore broke the thread and stretched the next section of the web, threading up the needle and passing through the loops of web on the diagonal (Gina explains this in her instructions). I then tied the thread end back to the ball end of thread.

I had a lot more thinking here about where to go next – tee hee.

AW Lace Shawl 15

I worked rows 1-4 as previously adding extra knots where the diagonal threads crossed to make sure that the intersection was well anchored.

I then started row 5 and had a lot more thinking on the corner section. The full peak sections on either side were to be completed in the same pattern but I wasn’t sure what to put in the corner. I liked how I had continued the bottom border section keeping the design cohesive.

AW Lace Shawl 16

Continuing row 5: After the first 3 knots (worked as per the normal pattern) I then moved to the centre and knotted up one side of the diagonal and back down the other (k 2e). This anchored all the threads well on the upper part of the diagonal. Note that I split the thread groups (see above where the outer threads are grouped together on the web) to make a lacy effect. I hope that this makes sense. It is difficult to explain – sorry.

Continuing row 6: I worked the first peak in the same way as usual then worked 3 knots up the outer edge (as in a normal row start). See picture below.

AW Lace Shawl 17

The corner was completed by weaving 2 little ‘leaf’ sections across the diagonal threads. Starting at the tip I wove down to the middle (filling the space), then up the other side and then 3 knots were worked down to the trough section as normal. The next section being worked as per the normal pattern.

The lace was then removed from the corner loom and replaced back onto the border loom ready to work up the other side (as shown above).

AW Lace Shawl 18

Here you can see the full length of one border and the corner turned ready to work the other side. I got very excited here – ha ha.

AW Lace Shawl 19

Here is a close up where you can see the corner more clearly.

Although fairly pleased I still wasn’t completely happy with it (more thinking! Ha ha).

AW Lace Shawl 20

I took the lace back off the border loom and quickly anchored it back onto the corner. With a new length of thread I added a little circle of weaving (over 5 groups of thread). I was happier with the result now.

AW Lace Shawl 22

I continued with the usual pattern until the last section. Here I again wanted a diagonal finish on the end.

AW Lace Shawl 21

Here I have shown the corner of the scarf so you can see what I mean. The loom is not designed to make diagonal ends as I am wanting so you can see one of the pins is slightly out of alignment here. This loop is adjusted when knotting (see below).

AW Lace Shawl 24

You can see here that the misaligned pin is removed as the last knot is worked on row 2 (the ball thread end then being tightened up). The other pins sit on the diagonal path OK.

AW Lace Shawl 23

Happy with my finished corner – finally – ha ha.

Block Printing:

AW Lace Shawl 25

Next I wanted to create a pretty block printed border.

I used the lime green paint on the outer part of the block (applying with kitchen sponge).

I mixed a little of the Raspberry and Violet with quite a lot of White to create a colour that matched well with my lilac thread. This mix was sponged onto the inner section of the block for printing.

The scarf was laid onto the foam base for printing. This provides a little cushioning against the solid wood block ensuring that the detail prints well.

AW Lace Shawl 27

Oooh yummy print.

AW Lace Shawl 26

Oooh – I was a happy bunny. I left the paint to fully dry overnight then heat fixed by ironing on the reverse on a cotton setting.

AW Lace Shawl 28

I then hand stitched on the lace border easing it to fit. In order to provide a little stretch and ease I used a slight zig zag when stitching (this allows a little stretch without popping of the thread). Next I sprayed with starch and ironed. This smoothed any slight lumps & waves that formed after attaching the lace and also stabilised the lace nicely.

AW Lace Shawl 29

I was so chuffed with how the lace border and printing looked.

The Floral Daisy Motifs:

 

AW Lace Shawl 30

Next I worked 16 small daisy motifs on loom 3.

I stretched the web on the smallest circle and lime thread to create 16 edge loops (i.e. total of 32 threads crossing the central section).

I then worked DD (double darning 2e) for 2 rows in the centre to neaten up the crossing threads etc. On the second row I offset the threads darned in the first row (as in weaving).

I then worked Revs (2) for 3 rows: Reverse backstitch over 2 threads. Ensuring that the threads from adjacent ‘loops’ were grouped together to form the outer ‘petal’ loops. Note: The side facing you is the back of the work.

Then I worked K 2e for 1 row: Knotting 2 threads together to secure groups of threads creating the long scalloped edge loops that make the petals.

AW Lace Shawl 31

These little flowers would make great earrings or could be joined to make a lovely necklace. In fact it was these that gave me the idea for my black lace earrings blogged in my previous post earlier today.

AW Lace Shawl 32

Finally I finished the shawl by sewing the little daisies into the centre of the block printed motifs.

AW Lace Shawl 33

I hope that you like my lace shawl. Teneriffe Lace is definitely a ‘slow craft’ akin to knitting or cross stitch, don’t expect quick results. This project took me around 25 hours to make! Take your time and enjoy the process xxxx.

Messenger Bag created using fabric panel from Chocolate Baroque

AW Bag Front 1

Good morning. I was so excited about the launch of the new fabric panels from Chocolate Baroque – enlarged images from my favourite stamp company printed onto fabric ready to paint and stitch – yay!

I have been working on a bag design big enough to carry A4 folders plus craft stash for when I am out & about. The large bag flap was a perfect place to feature the Katya panel. You could create similar using a commercial bag pattern (messenger style or tote), or by applying the panel to a ready made bag front.

I have used fabric painting, stamping, applique of stamped images, stencilling, machine and hand embroidery – but don’t despair if you are a non stitcher. I have included an idea for decorating a ready made tote bag with no stitching involved. The panels are also fabulous to use in mixed media projects such as book covers or canvases too – just stick it down with some gel mat medium or book binding glue. Then add stamping and embellish as for other mixed media work.

Materials used:

  • Printed fabric panels (3 Ladies)
  • Stamp sets: Take It or Leaf It, Large Crackle Background, Artistic Affirmations, Harlequin Rose, Bold Blooms
  • Stencils: Silhouette Palace 1 and Silhouette Palace 2
  • Range of fabric paints from my stash – all fixed by ironing: silk paints (fluid), transparent and opaque fabric paints plus multi surface paints (off white, cream, red, orange, yellow, blue, turquoise, pink, purple, metallic pink/purple, transparent pearl and green glitter)
  • 3D fabric paint (pearl green) – such as Appliglue or similar
  • Alcohol ink pens (yellow, turquoise, pink, green)
  • Archival Inkpad (Jet Black)
  • Tonertex foiling fabric glue and foil (gold)
  • Cotton quilting fabric scraps for applique (white, purple, lilac, cerise, plus waste strips of printed batik)
  • Cotton fabric (black) for backing and framing panel
  • Machine embroidery threads (black, variegated pink/blue plus green/orange)
  • Hand embroidery threads: Stranded cotton (variegated pink/purple and orange/yellow), Pearl 5 cotton (variegated blue/green/turquoise)
  • Iron on paper backed glue mesh (such as Bondaweb or similar) and Fray Check Glue
  • Paint brush and Cut-N-Dry Foam
  • For making the bag I also used: sewing thread, heavy weight cotton fabric (blue), light weight linen patterned fabrics for lining (blue & cream), plastic sink drainer (for base), Bosal foam stabiliser (one side iron on), bag feet and magnetic clasps (silver colour), zipper (blue), shoulder strap (recycled from old bag)

How it was done:

I first made a lining using my heavy weight cotton and linen printed fabrics. I wanted a heavy weight long lasting lining so layered my fabrics and treated as one layer. I also included plenty of pockets. I haven’t included details of my pattern here – sorry – but it’s something I am working on for my own business. You could choose a commercial pattern for a messenger bag with a large front flap to decorate, or a tote style bag to feature the panel.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 1

I painted the Katya panel using transparent coloured paints so as not to obliterate the black outlines.

Fabric paints designed for light coloured fabrics are best suitable. Opaque colours (designed for dark fabrics) would obliterate the printing so you need to bear this in mind. I also used some paints designed for multi surfaces (including fabrics). These can sometimes leave a stiffer finish than those specifically designed for fabric. However, for a bag this can actually be a bonus and it is not essential to keep a soft fabric feel. If you are not intending to wash your fabrics then you can use just about anything that you would use on paper. However, I would recommend heat fixable paints for a bag as you don’t want colours to transfer from the bag or run if caught in the rain! Painting was fixed by ironing.

Tip: I like to leave my fabric painting overnight before heat fixing with an iron (follow the manufacturer’s directions). The panel is silk/cotton so can be ironed using a cotton setting safely. I usually iron from the back.

I did test the panel for compatibility with alcohol markers and found that if over wet and rubbed with alcohol the printing did bleed slightly so I would avoid these, or use with care (i.e. without flooding close to the printing).

AW Katya Fabric Panel 1a

I then applied some of the Tonertex glue, left to ‘dry’ (goes tacky as dries clear) and applied gold foil to elements of her headdress.

If you are not a sewer you could stop at this stage. As with card making the panel benefits from ‘mat & layering’. Black fabric provides a nice frame. You could back the fabrics with fusible web and iron onto a ready made bag. Heat fusible webbing does not always provide a strong hard wearing bond so gel mat medium, book binding glue or a fabric decoupage glue could be used to prevent the panel lifting off or fraying with extensive use. There are also several types of 3D paint that could be applied around the fabric edges too (e.g. Appliglue).

AW Katya Fabric Panel 2

I found some lovely strips of batik fabric in my ‘waste’ scraps bag (I knew that they were too nice to bin – ha ha) so I had to include them in my bag panel design. Nothing was stuck down yet.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 3

Next I stamped various colour fabric scraps to use as applique elements, using an Archival Inkpad. The images were dried and then heat set with an iron. Colour was then added using alcohol ink pens. Again colours were heat set.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 4

Fusible web was applied to the back to prevent fraying and the stamped and coloured images were cut out.

AW Fabric Paints 1

When stamping with paints I prefer to apply them to my stamps using Cut-N-Dry Foam. I find that it gives a more even application with less clogging of the stamp than brushing or using kitchen sponges etc. In addition if placed paint side down in a plastic tray (recycled) they stay wet for longer. This is particularly so for multi purpose paints that can dry out very quickly. I also spritz the tray lightly with water to help keep them wet while working.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 5

The fabric background was first coloured using the fluid silk paints (they are like an ‘ink’ formulation rather than thicker paint) – encouraging them to bleed and blend with a light water spritz. As with card making I tried to create a darker blended edge to frame the scene.

Next the bag panel was stamped and stencilled. The applique elements and panel were ironed down (using the fusible web backing). I used the border stamp across the top edge and lovely crackle stamp in the background. I had to add a little bling with the metallic colour too (you know me! – ha ha).

Tip: Stamping onto a darker fabric you will need to use darker or more opaque paints (or they won’t show up). Metallics work well too.

I added some 3D glue ‘pearls’ to Katya’s headdress and overlayed some areas with transparent pearl paint for extra shimmer. I also added glitter paint to some areas. Simply wasn’t enough bling already.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6

The panel was backed with foam stabiliser before embroidery (I wanted a quilted effect). I stitched down the panel and fabric strips and then used free machine embroidery to stitch down and decorate the applique. Hand stitching was added for additional texture.

Note: The fusible web backing does help prevent fraying but some areas may benefit from a little Fray Check along the fabric edges (e.g. my batik strips were not backed with webbing before stitching down so are likely to fray with wear).

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6a

Detail showing stencilling, stamping and embroidery.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6b

I used free machine embroidery and black thread around the applique motifs, then further embellished with hand embroidery. The stamped smaller flowers were free machined with variegated thread.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6c

Here you can see the stencilled palace with additional hand embroidery to highlight.

AW Bag Back 1

The back panel was also decorated.

AW Bag Back 1a

Love this sentiment stamp – describes me perfectly.

AW Bag Back 2

So happy with my decorated bag (back).

AW Bag inner front 1

The pockets on the front panel were also decorated (sits under the front flap).

AW Bag inner front 1a

Detail – love this sentiment too.

AW Bag inner front 2

The finished pockets with magnetic snap closures (to hold down the front flap).

AW Bag Sides 1

I also decorated the little side pockets.

AW Bag Sides 2

AW Bag Sides 3

Texture added with hand embroidery.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6d

Here you can see a little more detail of the free machining and hand embroidery on the main Katya panel.

AW Bag Front 1

I hope that you have enjoyed my latest creation.

Hope to be back with more soon, Anne xxx.

Sewing themed stamps from Chocolate Baroque on Hochanda today

Chocolate Baroque are back on Hochanda TV today (2pm) and tomorrow (8am) bringing lovely sewing themed stamps and other creative goodies (Freeview Channel 85 or watch online via their website).

 

Here is one that I created with the Haberdashery stamp set x.

AW Haberdashery and Colour Challenge 21

Materials:

  • Haberdashery stamp set
  • Scalloped white card blank (6 X 6 inch), Core’dinations card (dark teal), white stamping card
  • Inkpads: Versafine(Onyx Black), dye based (purple, light turquoise)
  • Spectrum Aqua watercolour pens (Crafters Companion)
  • Hexagonal design embossing folder (Embossalicious)
  • Trellis die (Tonic)
  • Pale purple ribbon, sanding block, adhesive

How to make it:

  1. Emboss the teal card and sand it back to highlight the texture. Trim and glue to the card front.
  2. Overstamp the die cut trellis randomly using the button stamps with purple and turquoise inkpads. Glue to the card front.
  3. Stamp the haberdashery elements with Versafine. Cut out and colour with watercolour pens. Glue to the card front. Finish with a small bow.

Mixed Media Floral Canvas

Hi all. Today I am sharing a floral mixed media canvas. I started it just over a year ago and it had been sitting as a ‘UFO’ ever since. I usually continue with a project until it is finished, but must admit that if it gets put away before finishing I find it very difficult to get it back on track. So pleased that I dug it back out and got inspired to complete it.

AW Flower Canvas 1

I started working on this at Powertex Headquarters as part of my Level 1 training. I have to say that it was a fabulous couple of days where Tracey took us through a whole host of fabulous techniques.

Black Powertex was used to coat a 12 X 12 primed and stretched canvas. Various fabrics, pieces of lace, kitchen paper and Paper Decoration (White) were coated with Powertex and laid onto the canvas. Small polycarbonate test tubes were covered in cling film (to protect) and incorporated into the canvas. The layers were left to dry before working on the next stages. I also coated the little wooden canvas stretchers to make am area for maybe adding text.

AW Flower Canvas 2

Various pigment colours were mixed and applied with Easy Varnish (Powercolor: Burgundy, Ultramarine, White; Colortricx: Rich Gold and Powerpearl). Initially I was unhappy with the results as everything appeared too dark. I am definitely a colour girl. After some thought I drizzled on some Green Powercolor in Varnish diluted with a little water to make more of a wash. Oooh – much happier.

This was the stage at which it was almost finished but I still wasn’t happy with it – hence it sat in the cupboard for a year. I really thought that it needed more decoration and building up with embellishments. I collected together some MDF cogs (already treated with Black Powertex and rubbed over with gold gilding wax), die cut birds, silk flowers and air dry clay flowers created with silicone moulds from my stash. I also had a stash of moulded flowers created with pearlescent acrylic modelling paste (I put some turquoise glitter in the moulds while making these – yay bling).

AW Flower Canvas 3

I added more colour to the canvas using the new Metallic Inks from the Secret Art Loft (Aqua and Golden).

The paper clay and card embellishments were coated with Black Powertex before sticking down. Where needed I used Easy Structure Paste tinted with Powertex to make a 3D glue for sticking down.

The sentiment (from Chocolate Baroque) was stamped onto card with Versamark (Onyx Black) and applied with Easycoat Matt Medium to glue and seal. The pine cones were treated with Bronze Powertex and rubbed over with gold gilding wax. Beginning to love it now.

AW Flower Canvas 4

I continued building layers of embellishments and also added some created with yellow tinted clay and treated with Transparent Powertex. I liked the pop of complimentary colour. More colour was also added to Varnish and dry brushed over the textural surfaces. I really love the new Secret Art Loft Pigments (Interference Lilac, Limoncello Gold, Violet Valentine), they are so vibrant over dark backgrounds.

The silk flowers were treated with Black Powertex and dry brushed with Violet Valentine and Interference Lilac Pigments. Clear varnish was applied over the yellow flowers and the acrylic embellishments to seal. A little Glossy Accents was applied over the sentiment to emphasise.

I was really chuffed with the final piece. I hope that you like it too.

AW Flower Canvas 5

The great thing about this canvas is that the faux flowers can be removed and replaced with real ones (the tubes are removable and can be filled with a little water). I was initially planning to hang the canvas at an angle but I rather like this orientation with the flowers going at 45 degrees.

AW Flower Canvas 6

Well that’s all for today. Back with more creations soon, Anne x.

AW Flower Canvas 7

Unicorn Blessings

Hi all, today I am sharing one of my projects created during the Powertex Garden Party in July. It was an amazing weekend and I went along with my ex’s lovely daughter Marie. Living far apart we rarely get the chance to be together – so it was extra special to have a whole weekend creating together.

Others also came along with friends or family but many came along on their own. Some were familiar with Powertex and some, like Marie, were completely new to the medium. Whether experienced or not, travelling with friends or alone, the Team at Powertex were wonderfully inviting and everyone soon felt relaxed and eager to get started. Tracey gave us all fabulous instructions to help us along the way. It was a wonderfully relaxed weekend and we made many new friends.

AW Unicorn 1

One of the projects was to create a Unicorn (or pony if preferred). We were taken through the process and instructed on the appropriate media to create a fully weatherproof piece that could be used as a garden ornament.

AW Unicorn 2

We were all give a Metal Base with attached MDF Unicorn Template which had already been wrapped with masking tape ready for working.

AW Unicorn 3

The first step was to paint the whole with a base layer of Bronze Powertex. Then layers of Powertex clay (created with Powertex and Stone Art) were built onto the surface and texturised using wooden print blocks and various tools. The Team had kindly mixed up the clay ready for us to use.

AW Unicorn 4

We then had a choice of floral silicone moulds to use to make pretty clay embellishments. I chose the lovely Daisy Moulds.

AW Unicorn 5

Next we treated Powercotton fibres with Powertex to create the mane and tail. Pigment colours were used to add colour. I chose to blend a mix of Ultramarine and Titanium White, plus Burgundy and Titanium White Powercolors, mixed with Easy Varnish and a little water to create a blended colour wash.

AW Unicorn 6

Next we dry brushed more colour over the surface to pick up and emphasise the texture. I used Colortricx in Silver.

AW Unicorn 7

When I got home I added a bit more colouring by dry brushing with Rich Gold Colortricx and Interference Violet (Secret Art Loft Pigment).

AW Unicorn 8

If you know me you will know that I cannot resist a bit of bling. I just had to try adding glitter to the varnish and painted this onto the tail and mane. I used a holographic silvery glitter designed to be added to household paint. In theory it should be weatherproof when embedded in the Easy Varnish (will see how it holds up after she is installed in the garden). Oooooh I love her.

AW Unicorn 9

Note: There is a Unicorn Dreams Project Pack available which contains everything needed to create your own magical Unicorn – includes metal base, MDF Unicorn, Powertex, Art Stone, Flower Mould, Pigments, Varnish and instructions.

AW Unicorn Base 1

I also decided to add a little more texture to the base. I added a rough layer of clay and pressed in a crackle textured rubber stamp. I also added 3D Sand and Balls. Finally I treated a few stiff hessian threads with Powertex and pushed them into the clay to create grassy fronds. Various colours were dry brushed over the surface to blend in the base colours with the rest of the project.

AW Unicorn Marie

Here is Marie’s amazing Unicorn. Truly fantastic.

We all had so much fun and between us created an amazing array of very different takes on this theme. All wonderful.

Sending Unicorn Blessings, Anne x.

Indian Delights created with stamps from Chocolate Baroque

Good morning, today I am sharing a couple of projects created with the lovely Indian themed stamps from Chocolate Baroque.

AW Indian Shabby Chic

My first is a shabby chic style card. Think vintage block printed sari silk and old documents.

Materials:

  • Paisley Elephant and Nature’s Paisley stamp sets
  • A5 shaped card blank (14.5 X 20.5cm cream), cartridge paper (off white)
  • Inkpads: Rainbow dye ink (Kaleidacolor Country), Versafine (Vintage Sepia)
  • Ink sprays: Mr Huey’s (Classic Tan), Lindy’s Stamp Gang Starburst (Opal Sea Oats)
  • Alcohol marker (brown), Sakura Glaze pens (black and dark blue)
  • Soft Form Relief Paste (Copper)
  • Gilding Wax (Pebeo Empire Gold) and PVA pearls (Cosmic Shimmer Dark Bronze)
  • Textured velvet ribbon (brown),

How it was done:

  1. Soft Form Relief Paste was spread over the stamp and left to dry overnight before peeling away. Extra colour was added with glaze pens and gilding wax.
  2. The card blank was repeat stamped with the paisley background and rainbow ink. Alcohol marker was used to emphasise the edges. Textured ribbon was glued down to create a border.
  3. The cartridge paper was stamped using Versafine and trimmed to fit the card front. The edges were distressed and curled using scissors then coloured with alcohol marker. The paper was then spritzed with inks before gluing to the card front.
  4. The embellishment was glued to the card front with 3D glue gel for added depth. Finished with PVA pearls.

 

 

AW Elephant Scene

My second project is a bright and cheery elephant scene. You know how I love colour and bling. I had a lot of fun with this one.

Materials:

How it was done:

  1. Soft Form Relief Paste was spread over the stamps and left to dry overnight before peeling away. Extra colour was added using pink and gold metallic plus black paints. Glitter glue and PVA pearls were added for extra bling (you know me!).
  2. Watercolour card was spritzed with water and coloured by dropping on pigment powders. Images were stamped with Versafine (third generation stamping was used to faintly stamp the buildings in the background). The flowers were coloured with metallic pen (taking care not to obliterate the stamp detail – the ink was very opaque).
  3. The card was edged with Versamark and embossed with sparkly powder (Yay, more bling).
  4. The embellishments were glued to the card front with 3D glue gel for added depth. Yellow puff paint was applied to the foreground and heated to puff up and add texture.

Sad News

I hope that you like my latest projects. This will be my last regular post for Chocolate Baroque for a while. I have been working with this wonderful Design Team for over 3 years now and I am very sad to be leaving. Nothing to worry about, I just have to give extra priority to other things at the moment. However, you will still see the odd post from me in the guest blogger spot and in the Facebook Group. I simply cannot tear myself away completely.

Thank you all for your support and lovely feedback over the years. Big huggles, Anne xxxx.

Quick and Easy Indian Themed Cards

Good morning. I have created a couple of very quick and easy makes using Indian themed stamp sets from Chocolate Baroque.

AW Indian Birthday CAS

My first project was created using Indian Textiles and Paisley Elephant stamp sets, directly stamping onto a matte (absorbent) red scalloped card blank (12.5cm square). The border and sentiment were stamped with Versamark Ink and heat embossed with detail gold powder. A little colour was added with dark pink sparkle pen and purple glitter glue.

The background motifs were also stamped with Versamark and then a little mica powder (Jacquard Interference Red) brushed over using a soft make up brush.

AW Paisley CAS

My second card was created with Indian Textiles and Nature’s Paisley stamp sets.

The border was stamped directly onto the card blank (15 X 10 cm) using black StazOn Ink (note: I used StazOn as my card blank had a shiny coating – many other inks don’t dry properly on this surface).

The paisley motifs were stamped onto a black card panel using Versamark Ink and heat embossed with Mica Boss powder. This created a tacky finish on which gilding flakes were applied (special glue formulated to use with flakes could be used instead). Finished with little black sequins.