Study Bursary Finalists with The School of Stitched Textiles

I am so excited to have been chosen as a finalist to receive a Bursary to study with the School of Stitched Textiles.

 

Finalists are now needing votes – winners will receive a Bursary which will cover the study fees. To be awarded a Bursary would mean so much to me as unfortunately I am not in the position to afford the course fees.

 

Please could you spend just a minute to place a vote for your favourite finalist (I am under my full name – Heather Anne Waller). There are some fabulous entries, all deserving of a Bursary Award. Voting is simple, no name or personal details etc. required. Click this link to vote for your favourite finalist.

 

Thank you so much xxx.

 

AW Hat

The projects that I entered were my felted, quilted and embroidered coral reef hat

 

AW Earth Laughs Quilt small

and my patchwork hanging embellished with hand made ribbon flowers.

Ganutell Flowers on Hochanda TV today from Gina B Silkworks

Two great shows on Hochanda TV today from Gina Barrett (Freeview Channel 85 or watch catch up online from their website www.hochanda.com).

 

The first show was at mid day today (Sunday 31st March) with the Ganutell flowers (to watch catch up you can select the TV Schedule and pick the show to watch from there). At 4pm there will be a Teneriffe Lace show.

 

I used the Pretty Posy (pink version) Kit to make two variations of this necklace (using extra thread and wire from my stash). One I hung on a vintage brass chain, the other I created a wirework collar with vintage brass effect coated copper wire and beads. I will blog more details of how I created them soon.

AW Posy Kit NL Pink 1

AW Posy Kit NL Purple 1

I also had a lot of fun making flowers from the Ganutell Country Flowers Book.

I made a lovely poppy brooch for remembrance.

AW Poppy 8

AW Remembrance Poppy 1

I had a lot of fun creating a fairy door with lovely floral garden. I used various Powertex media and recycled packaging to create this and will blog more details later for you.

AW Fairy Door 1

Finally I made a floral Dream Catcher wreath.

AW Dream Catcher 1

Japanese Yubinuki, Hishikazari and Sagemon from Gina B Silkworks

Japanese crafts from Gina B Silkworks will be on Hochanda TV tomorrow (4pm – Freeview Channel 85 or watch online via their website hochanda.com).

Here is a little sneaky peek of my show samples. Gina will be bringing a variety of tools and kits to create some lovely Japanese decorations including Yubinuki, Hishikazari (Dragon Boats) and Sagemon characters.

AW Japanese sp

 

I will be blogging more details of my samples over the next couple of weeks.

 

Bye for now, Anne xxx.

Ribbon Ruching Flower Combs from Gina B Silkworks

Ribbon Ruching Flower Combs from Gina B Silkworks will be on Hochanda TV tomorrow (8am – Freeview Channel 85 or watch online via their website hochanda.com).

 

Here is a little sneaky peek of my show samples.

AW Ribbon Comb sp

The ribbon ruching combs enable you to mark out a variety of gathering stitch designs onto fabric strips and ribbon to make lovely textured trims and flowers. They can also be used to mark out quilting or ruched smocking designs too.

 

I will blog more details of my samples over the next couple of weeks.

Bye for now, Anne xxx.

Messenger Bag created using fabric panel from Chocolate Baroque

AW Bag Front 1

Good morning. I was so excited about the launch of the new fabric panels from Chocolate Baroque – enlarged images from my favourite stamp company printed onto fabric ready to paint and stitch – yay!

I have been working on a bag design big enough to carry A4 folders plus craft stash for when I am out & about. The large bag flap was a perfect place to feature the Katya panel. You could create similar using a commercial bag pattern (messenger style or tote), or by applying the panel to a ready made bag front.

I have used fabric painting, stamping, applique of stamped images, stencilling, machine and hand embroidery – but don’t despair if you are a non stitcher. I have included an idea for decorating a ready made tote bag with no stitching involved. The panels are also fabulous to use in mixed media projects such as book covers or canvases too – just stick it down with some gel mat medium or book binding glue. Then add stamping and embellish as for other mixed media work.

Materials used:

  • Printed fabric panels (3 Ladies)
  • Stamp sets: Take It or Leaf It, Large Crackle Background, Artistic Affirmations, Harlequin Rose, Bold Blooms
  • Stencils: Silhouette Palace 1 and Silhouette Palace 2
  • Range of fabric paints from my stash – all fixed by ironing: silk paints (fluid), transparent and opaque fabric paints plus multi surface paints (off white, cream, red, orange, yellow, blue, turquoise, pink, purple, metallic pink/purple, transparent pearl and green glitter)
  • 3D fabric paint (pearl green) – such as Appliglue or similar
  • Alcohol ink pens (yellow, turquoise, pink, green)
  • Archival Inkpad (Jet Black)
  • Tonertex foiling fabric glue and foil (gold)
  • Cotton quilting fabric scraps for applique (white, purple, lilac, cerise, plus waste strips of printed batik)
  • Cotton fabric (black) for backing and framing panel
  • Machine embroidery threads (black, variegated pink/blue plus green/orange)
  • Hand embroidery threads: Stranded cotton (variegated pink/purple and orange/yellow), Pearl 5 cotton (variegated blue/green/turquoise)
  • Iron on paper backed glue mesh (such as Bondaweb or similar) and Fray Check Glue
  • Paint brush and Cut-N-Dry Foam
  • For making the bag I also used: sewing thread, heavy weight cotton fabric (blue), light weight linen patterned fabrics for lining (blue & cream), plastic sink drainer (for base), Bosal foam stabiliser (one side iron on), bag feet and magnetic clasps (silver colour), zipper (blue), shoulder strap (recycled from old bag)

How it was done:

I first made a lining using my heavy weight cotton and linen printed fabrics. I wanted a heavy weight long lasting lining so layered my fabrics and treated as one layer. I also included plenty of pockets. I haven’t included details of my pattern here – sorry – but it’s something I am working on for my own business. You could choose a commercial pattern for a messenger bag with a large front flap to decorate, or a tote style bag to feature the panel.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 1

I painted the Katya panel using transparent coloured paints so as not to obliterate the black outlines.

Fabric paints designed for light coloured fabrics are best suitable. Opaque colours (designed for dark fabrics) would obliterate the printing so you need to bear this in mind. I also used some paints designed for multi surfaces (including fabrics). These can sometimes leave a stiffer finish than those specifically designed for fabric. However, for a bag this can actually be a bonus and it is not essential to keep a soft fabric feel. If you are not intending to wash your fabrics then you can use just about anything that you would use on paper. However, I would recommend heat fixable paints for a bag as you don’t want colours to transfer from the bag or run if caught in the rain! Painting was fixed by ironing.

Tip: I like to leave my fabric painting overnight before heat fixing with an iron (follow the manufacturer’s directions). The panel is silk/cotton so can be ironed using a cotton setting safely. I usually iron from the back.

I did test the panel for compatibility with alcohol markers and found that if over wet and rubbed with alcohol the printing did bleed slightly so I would avoid these, or use with care (i.e. without flooding close to the printing).

AW Katya Fabric Panel 1a

I then applied some of the Tonertex glue, left to ‘dry’ (goes tacky as dries clear) and applied gold foil to elements of her headdress.

If you are not a sewer you could stop at this stage. As with card making the panel benefits from ‘mat & layering’. Black fabric provides a nice frame. You could back the fabrics with fusible web and iron onto a ready made bag. Heat fusible webbing does not always provide a strong hard wearing bond so gel mat medium, book binding glue or a fabric decoupage glue could be used to prevent the panel lifting off or fraying with extensive use. There are also several types of 3D paint that could be applied around the fabric edges too (e.g. Appliglue).

AW Katya Fabric Panel 2

I found some lovely strips of batik fabric in my ‘waste’ scraps bag (I knew that they were too nice to bin – ha ha) so I had to include them in my bag panel design. Nothing was stuck down yet.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 3

Next I stamped various colour fabric scraps to use as applique elements, using an Archival Inkpad. The images were dried and then heat set with an iron. Colour was then added using alcohol ink pens. Again colours were heat set.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 4

Fusible web was applied to the back to prevent fraying and the stamped and coloured images were cut out.

AW Fabric Paints 1

When stamping with paints I prefer to apply them to my stamps using Cut-N-Dry Foam. I find that it gives a more even application with less clogging of the stamp than brushing or using kitchen sponges etc. In addition if placed paint side down in a plastic tray (recycled) they stay wet for longer. This is particularly so for multi purpose paints that can dry out very quickly. I also spritz the tray lightly with water to help keep them wet while working.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 5

The fabric background was first coloured using the fluid silk paints (they are like an ‘ink’ formulation rather than thicker paint) – encouraging them to bleed and blend with a light water spritz. As with card making I tried to create a darker blended edge to frame the scene.

Next the bag panel was stamped and stencilled. The applique elements and panel were ironed down (using the fusible web backing). I used the border stamp across the top edge and lovely crackle stamp in the background. I had to add a little bling with the metallic colour too (you know me! – ha ha).

Tip: Stamping onto a darker fabric you will need to use darker or more opaque paints (or they won’t show up). Metallics work well too.

I added some 3D glue ‘pearls’ to Katya’s headdress and overlayed some areas with transparent pearl paint for extra shimmer. I also added glitter paint to some areas. Simply wasn’t enough bling already.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6

The panel was backed with foam stabiliser before embroidery (I wanted a quilted effect). I stitched down the panel and fabric strips and then used free machine embroidery to stitch down and decorate the applique. Hand stitching was added for additional texture.

Note: The fusible web backing does help prevent fraying but some areas may benefit from a little Fray Check along the fabric edges (e.g. my batik strips were not backed with webbing before stitching down so are likely to fray with wear).

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6a

Detail showing stencilling, stamping and embroidery.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6b

I used free machine embroidery and black thread around the applique motifs, then further embellished with hand embroidery. The stamped smaller flowers were free machined with variegated thread.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6c

Here you can see the stencilled palace with additional hand embroidery to highlight.

AW Bag Back 1

The back panel was also decorated.

AW Bag Back 1a

Love this sentiment stamp – describes me perfectly.

AW Bag Back 2

So happy with my decorated bag (back).

AW Bag inner front 1

The pockets on the front panel were also decorated (sits under the front flap).

AW Bag inner front 1a

Detail – love this sentiment too.

AW Bag inner front 2

The finished pockets with magnetic snap closures (to hold down the front flap).

AW Bag Sides 1

I also decorated the little side pockets.

AW Bag Sides 2

AW Bag Sides 3

Texture added with hand embroidery.

AW Katya Fabric Panel 6d

Here you can see a little more detail of the free machining and hand embroidery on the main Katya panel.

AW Bag Front 1

I hope that you have enjoyed my latest creation.

Hope to be back with more soon, Anne xxx.

Coral Reef Hat Needle Felt and Embroidery

Good evening. This is my first try at making a hat and I had an adventure.

AW Reef Hat 1

 

I created the fabric using needle felting with green and blue wool fibres onto a loose woven fabric base (leftover curtain interlining for a bit of body). I made up the hat pattern as I went and reinforced the outer rim section using steel memory wire (encased in the fabric rim and covered with cord braid to neaten).

 

AW Reef Hat 3

Silk fibres and fabric scraps were needle felted onto the background for added texture.

 

AW Reef Hat 4

 

Some free machine embroidery and quilting was also worked into the background.

 

AW Reef Hat 5

3D pearlescent fabric paint added more texture. I made a little rock pool in the top.

 

AW Reef Hat 6 

Then I went mad with the embellishing. The machine embroidered elements were created as embroidery slips onto old cotton bed sheets. These were then cut out and stitched in place. Extra padding was added to some of the embroidered elements (snipping through from the back and stuffing with a little wadding) to give a more 3D look.

 

AW Reef Hat 7

Sorry – dreadful pic!  The hat inner was made with blue taffeta and stitched to an outer layer of recycled curtain interlining, a strip of stiffer interfacing used for the inner brim (fitted to head). Free machine and decorative machine embroidery were added around the rim to give it structure. A few sequins were also added for bling. The outer decorated hat was then slotted on top, everything held together around the inner and outer rim sections.

 

AW Reef Hat 8

I also embellished with real shells and sea urchins too.

 

AW Reef Hat 9

 

AW Reef Hat 10

 

AW Reef Hat 11

 

I also created some coral made by wrapping recycled plastic beads with organza, further embellished with little pink seed beaded branches.

 

AW Reef Hat 12

 

AW Reef Hat 13

 

Strips of the blue organza were gathered and twirled to give the spongy coral effect. The edges were frayed to enhance.

 

AW Reef Hat 14

The starfish was created with shell sticks, texture added using tiny glass microbeads.

 

AW Reef Hat 15

 

AW Reef Hat 16

AW Reef Hat 17

AW Reef Hat 18

AW Reef Hat 19

 

I hope that you have enjoyed looking through my coral reef creation. I certainly had a lot of fun creating this one and got totally lost in my own little fantasy sea world xxx.

Floral Trinket Box created with Powertex

AW Wire Box 8

I have had a wire box frame in my stash for ages. Originally it had a woven straw covering that fell apart so I removed it with the intention of recovering it. It ended up as another ‘UFO’ (unfinished object) for years. I have finally dug it out and created this Powertex treated fabric box embellished with hand made fabric flowers. Now it’s a fabulous trinket box for storing some of my crafty treasures.

AW Wire Box 1

The bare wire frame is a strong construction – similar to the type of wire used to make coat hangers. It measures approx. 8 inches square across the top and 6 inches deep.

AW Wire Box 2

I used some recycled cotton bed sheets and treated them with Black Powertex to cover the box and lid. I lined the outer and inner panels to completely cover the wire frame. I gathered some cotton trims for the next stage; some crochet lace and a piece of gathered Broderie Anglaise.

AW Wire Box 3

I treated the crochet lace with Powertex and applied around the box base.

AW Wire Box 4

The gathered lace was applied around the lid. I also dug out some greyboard lazer cut foliage shapes to embellish the top. These were coated and stuck down with Powertex. When dry I started dry brushing over the surface using Easy Varnish and Silver Colotricx. Extra colour was applied to the foliage to make it stand out from the dry brushed background.

AW Wire Box 5

Here you can see the dry brushed lid next to the unpainted base. The dry brushing has emphasised the texture and added metallic highlights.

AW Wire Box 9

Next I made some fabric roses from 25mm and 15mm strips cut from recycled bedding. These were created using Ribbon Ruching Flower Combs from Gina B-Silkworks. Basically strips are marked out using the Flower Comb templates, a running stitch is sewn along the marked lines and the stitching is pulled up to gather and shape into a rose. I prepared my strips and treated with Powertex before pulling up the stitching. The Powertex holds and glues the gathering in place. I left the flowers to dry before adding to the box top.

To create the roses I followed instructions detailed in Gina’s new Ribbonwork Flowers Book: Twist Roses from 25mm cotton strips using comb 3a (Rococo Comb Set) and 1930’s Roses from 15mm strips using comb 13a (Venezia Comb Set).

AW Wire Box 7

I used one of my dies to cut a frame for the centre (Sizzix), applied to the top and finished in the same way as the greyboard foliage.

The flowers were dry brushed with Easy Varnish and Interference Lilac Pigment. Loving these new Pearl Pigment colours! Powertex was then used to glue down the roses to the centre. I added some ready made flower stamens around the group (purple), and some small ready made satin ribbon roses to the corners (Powertex treated and coloured).

Next I mixed some 3D Sand and Balls into Black Powertex and drizzled the mix around the flowers. A few untreated balls were also dropped into the wet Powertex. The untreated balls kept their original colour on the surface giving contrast with the black base. Once dry I coloured by brushing over the surface using Easy Varnish and Mojito Lime Pigment.

I also dry brushed a little of the Lilac pigment sparingly over the lace trims and used to colour some hand made air dry clay embellishments (created using a silicone mould from my stash) added to the box corners.

I used one of my large rubber stamps (lace design from Heartfelt Creations) to stamp some extra textural interest around the sides using Viola Metallic Acrylic Ink. Note: the fabric surface is already quite textured and not very flat so the stamping does not give a clear impression of the design but just adds a little more depth and interest to the surface.

AW Wire Box 10

I hope that you like my new treasure box.

Hugs, Anne xxx.