Teneriffe Lace Shawl created with Vandyke Border Loom from Gina B Silkworks

Tonight I am sharing a shawl embellished with Teneriffe Lace and block printing that I made ready for Gina’s Lace show on Hochanda TV tomorrow at mid day (29th Oct 2019 on Freeview Channel 85 or watch catch up online via their website).

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Gina has a button show at 4pm too where she will be bringing lots of her fabby historical button making kits, books and DVDs. Both shows are a must to see if you love textile embellishments, trims and passementerie.

Materials:

  • Lime green crochet cotton no.3 (Delfino – Filo Di Scozia)
  • Lilac DMC Mouline Cotton (like a standard 6 strand embroidery floss but on a large spool)
  • Sewing thread and needle (lime green)
  • Lime green cotton triangular shawl (made from quilting cotton) with sides measuring approx. 1m (I overlocked the edges using matching thread to prevent fraying)
  • Teneriffe Lace Starter Kit Loom 3 (Gina B Silkworks)
  • Teneriffe Lace Vandyke Border Loom set (Gina B Silkworks)
  • Fabric glue (optional)
  • Laundry starch spray (optional)
  • Thick dense foam mat (such as provided with Gina’s Total Trimmings Table) or upholstery foam (optional if wanting to use pins for stretching the web)
  • Decorative Indian wooden printing block and foam printing mat (Colouricious). The one I chose from my stash was approx. 9.5cm square with space in the centre to add the lace floral motifs
  • Setacolor Opaque (Spring Green, Raspberry and Parma Violet) and Deka Perm (Opaque White) fabric paints
  • Kitchen sponge and paint tray
  • Iron

How to do it:

Gina’s loom kits provide general instructions for stretching the web, darning, reverse backstitch and knotting etc.

Note: The hardest part to get right is the Teneriffe Lace Knot which holds it all together. Get this wrong and your lace won’t hold together properly when you remove it from the loom. Should this happen, don’t despair, do what I did with my first lace attempts and glue it to a card or a mixed media canvas. Ha ha.

There is a great beginners video from Gina to help with this.

I spent quite some time developing the lace pattern by quite a lot of experimenting, undoing and redoing until I was happy with the result. Don’t be afraid to play. Gina has also provided some easy starter lace borders in the instructions so you could try these first and make up a couple of smaller projects first.

The Border Lace:

Whenever thread ends were tied and finished, or working threads joined with knots, I added a small dab of clear drying fabric glue for extra security. This is optional but I thought it would ensure no loosening of thread ends, particularly during lots of wear and washing etc.

AW Lace Shawl 1

Starting: I stretched the web on the Vandyke Border Loom leaving a long end at the start and keeping the ball in place on the left hand side (to avoid making joins as the border is continued). Here I have wrapped the thread end a couple of times around the loom end to hold the tension in place.

I made an angle on the first end so that it would continue on the shape of the shawl corner. The pins were placed on a diagonal and threads held together by K 2e (knotting 2 threads to hold).

Note: When working some of the bigger projects I prefer to use pins to hold the web rather than lacing with waste thread. It is a little less portable in this method but much quicker to stretch the web.

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Row 1: I worked a row of sc (scalloped edge by k 2e to create small anchored loops) along the bottom edge, joining in a new thread as required.

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Row 2: Next I worked a row of K 2e (keeping the pairs of threads in alignment with the first bottom row of knots) along the centre of the lace band.

Note: For each row I joined a new length of yarn. Once worked this was loosely wrapped and tied (to prevent tangling) and kept on the left hand side, ready to work the next section of the lace as the lace is moved on along the loom.

Row 3: I then worked a row of sc along the top edge. See how the threads now separate to give a lacy effect. Again I joined a new thread for this row.

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Row 4: A row of k 4e (4 threads knotted together such that the groups of knotted threads aligned with the peaks and troughs of the top edge) was worked in the centre of the bottom straight border section. This opened out the threads into a pretty lace design.

Row 5: A row of *k 2e (x3), k 4e (x1), K 2e (x3)* was repeated along the top border. The 2e knots were worked just below the knots on the sc edge and the 4e knots were worked about half way down the space. This created a nice section with 7 little spaces, ideal for darning (weaving) in the next row.

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Row 6: Next I joined in the lilac thread. To start I knotted just under the threads of the previous row until reaching the centre of the 7 space section.

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Row 6 continued: The 7 space section was progressively darned (pdt) for 8 rounds. The thread was taken under 1, over 2, under 2, over 1, under 1, then over 2 and under 1 to complete the first round (starting at the top left hand side single thread). As the rounds are worked the weave goes in the opposing over/under direction naturally (as there is an odd number of thread groups/spaces).

When 8 rounds were complete the thread was taken under the first thread bar again before moving along to the left with knotting.

Full row 6 repeat: *k 2e (x3), k 4e (x1), pdt (x8) in the round, u 1e, K 2e (x3)* repeated along the top border.

These 6 rows form the pattern repeat for the straight border sections. The straight knotting rows are quite quick to work but the darning does take a little longer. Well worth it though I think.

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The lace was then removed from the loom ready to work the next section.

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The first few loops were replaced onto the end of the loom and the next section of web was stretched ready to work. Here you can see the ball kept in place (keeping the web continuous without thread joins). The working threads were loosely tied for each row (keeping them separate, tying in a new length as required).

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The next section of lace was then worked as given above.

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Again the lace was moved along as each section was completed. I was so excited to see it grow.

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I had calculated that I would need 25 little peaks to fit along the sides of my scarf before needing to turn the corner (the space between each peak being approx. 4cm and the sides of my scarf being approx. 1m).

Note: The lace does pull in slightly when removed from the loom (the amount will vary depending on stitches used). Bear this in mind and check that the length of your lace is OK before turning the corner (particularly on a large project).

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As with the straight border I pinned the first few loops of lace onto the corner loom and laid out the pins ready to stretch the web.

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I stretched the web on the first half of the corner then spent some time thinking – how was I to make a corner pattern that would continue the straight sections nicely? This took me some time – ha ha.

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The threads on the corner diagonal of the web need to be interlocked. I therefore broke the thread and stretched the next section of the web, threading up the needle and passing through the loops of web on the diagonal (Gina explains this in her instructions). I then tied the thread end back to the ball end of thread.

I had a lot more thinking here about where to go next – tee hee.

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I worked rows 1-4 as previously adding extra knots where the diagonal threads crossed to make sure that the intersection was well anchored.

I then started row 5 and had a lot more thinking on the corner section. The full peak sections on either side were to be completed in the same pattern but I wasn’t sure what to put in the corner. I liked how I had continued the bottom border section keeping the design cohesive.

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Continuing row 5: After the first 3 knots (worked as per the normal pattern) I then moved to the centre and knotted up one side of the diagonal and back down the other (k 2e). This anchored all the threads well on the upper part of the diagonal. Note that I split the thread groups (see above where the outer threads are grouped together on the web) to make a lacy effect. I hope that this makes sense. It is difficult to explain – sorry.

Continuing row 6: I worked the first peak in the same way as usual then worked 3 knots up the outer edge (as in a normal row start). See picture below.

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The corner was completed by weaving 2 little ‘leaf’ sections across the diagonal threads. Starting at the tip I wove down to the middle (filling the space), then up the other side and then 3 knots were worked down to the trough section as normal. The next section being worked as per the normal pattern.

The lace was then removed from the corner loom and replaced back onto the border loom ready to work up the other side (as shown above).

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Here you can see the full length of one border and the corner turned ready to work the other side. I got very excited here – ha ha.

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Here is a close up where you can see the corner more clearly.

Although fairly pleased I still wasn’t completely happy with it (more thinking! Ha ha).

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I took the lace back off the border loom and quickly anchored it back onto the corner. With a new length of thread I added a little circle of weaving (over 5 groups of thread). I was happier with the result now.

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I continued with the usual pattern until the last section. Here I again wanted a diagonal finish on the end.

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Here I have shown the corner of the scarf so you can see what I mean. The loom is not designed to make diagonal ends as I am wanting so you can see one of the pins is slightly out of alignment here. This loop is adjusted when knotting (see below).

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You can see here that the misaligned pin is removed as the last knot is worked on row 2 (the ball thread end then being tightened up). The other pins sit on the diagonal path OK.

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Happy with my finished corner – finally – ha ha.

Block Printing:

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Next I wanted to create a pretty block printed border.

I used the lime green paint on the outer part of the block (applying with kitchen sponge).

I mixed a little of the Raspberry and Violet with quite a lot of White to create a colour that matched well with my lilac thread. This mix was sponged onto the inner section of the block for printing.

The scarf was laid onto the foam base for printing. This provides a little cushioning against the solid wood block ensuring that the detail prints well.

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Oooh yummy print.

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Oooh – I was a happy bunny. I left the paint to fully dry overnight then heat fixed by ironing on the reverse on a cotton setting.

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I then hand stitched on the lace border easing it to fit. In order to provide a little stretch and ease I used a slight zig zag when stitching (this allows a little stretch without popping of the thread). Next I sprayed with starch and ironed. This smoothed any slight lumps & waves that formed after attaching the lace and also stabilised the lace nicely.

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I was so chuffed with how the lace border and printing looked.

The Floral Daisy Motifs:

 

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Next I worked 16 small daisy motifs on loom 3.

I stretched the web on the smallest circle and lime thread to create 16 edge loops (i.e. total of 32 threads crossing the central section).

I then worked DD (double darning 2e) for 2 rows in the centre to neaten up the crossing threads etc. On the second row I offset the threads darned in the first row (as in weaving).

I then worked Revs (2) for 3 rows: Reverse backstitch over 2 threads. Ensuring that the threads from adjacent ‘loops’ were grouped together to form the outer ‘petal’ loops. Note: The side facing you is the back of the work.

Then I worked K 2e for 1 row: Knotting 2 threads together to secure groups of threads creating the long scalloped edge loops that make the petals.

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These little flowers would make great earrings or could be joined to make a lovely necklace. In fact it was these that gave me the idea for my black lace earrings blogged in my previous post earlier today.

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Finally I finished the shawl by sewing the little daisies into the centre of the block printed motifs.

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I hope that you like my lace shawl. Teneriffe Lace is definitely a ‘slow craft’ akin to knitting or cross stitch, don’t expect quick results. This project took me around 25 hours to make! Take your time and enjoy the process xxxx.

Teneriffe Lace Earrings created for Gina B Silkworks

Today I am sharing some quick to make Teneriffe Lace earrings that I made ready for Gina’s Lace show on Hochanda TV tomorrow at mid day (29th Oct on Freeview Channel 85 or watch catch up online via their website.

 

AW Loom 3 ER

Materials:

· Black crochet cotton no.12

· Teneriffe Lace Starter Kit Loom 3 (Gina B Silkworks)

· Fabric glue (optional)

· Silver plated earring findings

· Rolls Fabrifix Spray (roller blind fabric stiffener and protector spray)

· Baking parchment

How to do it:

Note: Gina’s starter kit provides general instructions for stretching the web, darning the centre, reverse backstitch and knotting etc.

1. Web (16): stretch the web on the smallest circle to create 16 edge loops (i.e. total of 32 threads crossing the central section).

2. Centre DD for 2 rows: Double darn the centre to neaten up the crossing threads etc. On the second row offset the threads darned in the first row (as in weaving).

3. Revs (2) for 4 rows: Reverse backstitch over 2 threads. Ensure that the threads from adjacent ‘loops’ are grouped together to form the outer ‘petal’ loops. Note: The side facing you is the back of the work.

4. K 2e for 1 row: Knot 2 threads together to secure groups of threads creating the long scalloped edge loops that make the petals. Fasten off and add a small dab of fabric glue if desired to seal the fastening knot.

5. Remove from the loom and spray both sides with stiffening spray. I laid my lace onto a bit of baking parchment to do this (so not stick). Note: Use this spray in a well ventilated area as the solvent is quite smelly. I like to use this spray as it both stiffens and protects the piece from moisture. It also dries very quickly (within a couple of minutes). Alternatively you could use diluted clear drying PVA glue or Transparent Powertex fabric hardener, but these are more messy and take a while to dry. Gina also produces a lovely Kanzashi Starch that could be used neat or diluted on the lace (great choice for pieces used as linens etc.).

Note: The hardest part to get right is the Teneriffe Lace Knot which holds it all together. Get this wrong and your lace won’t hold together properly when you remove it from the loom. Should this happen, don’t despair, do what I did with my first lace attempts and glue it to a card or a mixed media canvas.

There is a great beginners video from Gina to help with this.

I hope that you like the lace earrings. They are fairly quick to make and are ideal if you are a beginner and feel a little daunted with making the larger medallions. Teneriffe Lace is definitely a ‘slow craft’ akin to knitting or cross stitch, don’t expect quick results. Take your time and enjoy the process xxxx.

YouTube demo uploaded for Hishikazari Dragon Boats

Well I have finally done it – my first video demo on YouTube – eek. I am showing the new tool from Gina which enables you to create the little Japanese hanging decorations (Hishikazari – Dragon Boats). I have shown how to wrap them with thread and also how to treat them with Powertex if you want to make them more robust and use them in key rings, jewellery or bag charms etc.

 

I have a lot of Tech still to learn with video making – but here is a start to my new ventures on YouTube: – Video Link to Hishikazari demo.

 

I will blog and share a range of my finished projects soon x.

Indian Palace Card and Tag

My second project  today is a vibrant card with matching Birthday tag.

The theme for this weeks Simon Says Stamp Challenge is ‘Stamp on it’ so I have entered this one.

AW Indian Palaces

AW Indian Tag

Materials:

  • Indian Textiles and Paisley Elephant stamp sets, Silhouette Palaces Stencil 1 and Stencil 2
  • A5 card blank, mount board tag (11 X 5cm), white stamping card (21 X 7cm), flower cut from white vellum and white card leafy sprig
  • Inkpads: Versamark
  • Brusho Powders (Turquoise, Leaf Green) and Lindy’s Stamp Gang Magical Powders (pink, purple, yellow)
  • Fine embossing powders (Rich Gold, White)
  • Metallic paints (Starlight Rich Gold, Viva Décor Precious Metal 501 pink)
  • Sparkle pens (Spectrum Noir – clear, turquoise, deep purple, cerise pink)
  • Fine tipped markers (black, opaque white)
  • Gel pens (clear glaze and gold)
  • Large faux gem and sequins, organza ribbons (turquoise, lilac)

How they were made:

  1. The card strip and tag were coloured with water soluble powders, dropping them onto the card and spritzing with water.
  2. The palaces were stencilled with pink metallic paints. The masks were then overlaid and details added with gold paint. Extra highlights and the roof domes were also coloured with gold. The fine tipped black pen was used to draw in details and extra highlights were added with white pen.
  3. Sparkling rays were added from the dome tops using clear and gold gel pens plus clear sparkle pen. Black pen was used around the edges to frame.
  4. The sentiment was stamped onto the tag with Versamark and embossed with white powder. Finished with ribbons, vellum flower, leafy sprig, faux gem and sequins.
  5. The border was stamped onto the card blank with Versamark, embossed with gold powder and coloured with sparkle pens. Finished with sequins for extra bling. You know that I just cannot resist!

I hope that you have enjoyed my Indian bling makes today x.

Surreal Dreamy Tree Landscapes created with stamps from Chocolate Baroque

Good morning. Today I am sharing a couple of projects using the Rose Tree and Essence of Nature stamp sets from Chocolate Baroque.

My first is a surreal dreamlike scene using the pretty rose tree as the main focal point.

AW Rose Tree

The theme of this week’s Simon Says Stamp Challenge (Wed) is ‘use more than one stamp’ – so I have entered this one.

Materials:

  • Rose Tree and Essence of Nature stamp sets
  • 19.5cm X 14.5cm card blank, black card, white card (for backing), acetate (recycled packaging) and waste copy paper (to create masks)
  • Clear double sided sticky sheet
  • StazOn Inkpad (Jet Black)
  • Alcohol ink pens and opaque white marker
  • Bulb spritzer attachment to spray ink pen (similar to Ranger Distress Marker Spritzer)
  • Nail varnish remover
  • Glitters (green, gold and crystal)
  • Viva Décor Kristall Gel (Holographic)
  • Hexagon dies (Tonic)

How it was done:

  1. The scene was stamped onto the acetate using StazOn ink.
  2. Colouring was added to the reverse using alcohol ink pens. Strips of copy paper were used as a mask and alcohol ink spritzed using a bulb attachment for pens. Basically air is blown across the pen tip by squeezing the bulb, creating a spray. Some colour was dabbed away from the sky area using nail varnish remover.
  3. Double sided sticky sheet was then placed on the back and coloured glitters were dropped onto the scene, burnishing into the sticky sheet using a finger.
  4. A die was then used to cut out a hexagon shape from the centre of the scene. A little Kristall Gel was applied to the background panel for added texture and sparkle.
  5. White card was trimmed and glued to the back to make the images stand out. These were then backed with black card to create a border around the background and hexagon cut shape. White faux stitching was added to frame the images.

AW Butterfly Tree

My second project uses the lovely butterfly tree as the main focus to create another dreamy scene.

Materials:

  • Essence of Nature stamp set
  • 15cm square card blank, cartridge paper, metallic satin card (blue/silver), pink vellum
  • Versamark Inkpad and pen
  • Embossing powders (aqua sparkle and detail white)
  • Ink spritzers (pink and green) and sparkle brush pens (deep pink and clear)
  • Stickles glitter glue (Diamond) and PVA pearls (pink)
  • Large decorative square die (Tonic)

How it was done:

  1. The background was created using ink spritzers. The image was stamped with Versamark, embossed with sparkly powder and coloured with sparkle pens. The embossing pen was used to draw in extra hills extending the scene and anchoring the tree.
  2. The image was stamped again onto the vellum, embossed with white powder. The butterflies were cut out, shaped and glued onto the tree.
  3. The image was then framed with the decorative die cut and finished with glitter glue and PVA pearls.

Happy stamping, Anne xxx.

Sunflower Project Tray created with Powertex

Today I am sharing a decorated recycled Balsa wood cheese tray (19 X 25cm) left over from Christmas. I needed a small project tray to collect together all my embroidery and sewing thread spools when working on one of my textile stitched paintings. I kept the 3D texture to a minimum as I didn’t want my fine threads catching and pulling on anything.

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The theme for this Weeks Simon Says Stamp Blog Challenge (Wed) is ‘Anything Goes’ so I have entered this one.

I chose one of the lovely Floral Rice Papers and the fab Duo Arty Quotes Mini Stencil from Powertex to decorate. I wanted to create something that would give me some ‘arty’ inspiration. I had a few grey board embellishments in my stash (from ……) so added these too for a bit of interest.

AW Sunflower Tray 1

I first used a water pen to dampen around the images enabling them to be torn and separated to form soft edged pieces that will blend into the background once decoupaged.

I coated the whole tray with Ivory Powertex and dried using a hair dryer. This provided a light background for the decoupage elements. Coating the tray with Powertex hardened up the soft Balsa wood and sealed it making it easier to keep clean too. I also coated the grey board elements with Ivory Powertex.

AW Sunflower Tray 2

Decorative papers were then applied using Easy Coat Mat. Easy Structure Paste was then applied through the stencil using a recycled bank card. I also added a little more texture using a grid stencil from my stash.

AW Sunflower Tray 3

The embellishments were stuck down with more Powertex and a little Easy Structure Paste where needed (i.e. onto textured areas).

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In the background you can see a sneak peek of my next project in progress. I like to work on several things at once so that I don’t waste time waiting for layers to dry.

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Next I used a white opaque pen (acrylic paint pen) to draw extra highlights onto the main sunflower image. Then I used the new transparent acrylic inks to brush over and add a bit of colour. These are fabulous as being transparent they don’t obliterate the layers beneath. I chose the Golden Metallic and Aqua Metallic Inks to blend in with the main colour theme of the decoupaged images and to add a little sheen. I emphasized the lettering using a brown fine tipped pen (suitable for going onto acrylic).

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Where needed I also rubbed over a little more Ivory Powertex using my finger to blend in the colouring where I thought it was a bit heavy.

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I also rubbed on a little gold gilding wax from my stash (Pebeo).

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Finally I added a little clear PVA based glitter glue to bring a little sparkle. I just couldn’t help myself. Once dry I brushed over the whole tray with Easy Varnish.

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Now I have a lovely inspirational project tray. Hope that you like it too.

Hugs all and happy creating, Anne xxx

Floral Card created with stamps from Chocolate Baroque

Good afternoon. Today I am sharing two variations of a card created with Chocolate Baroque stamps and a pretty background paper from Crafty Individuals.

AW Flower Pot V1

The theme for this week’s Simon Says Stamp Challenge (Mon) is ‘Flower Power’ – so I have entered this one.

I have entered the other into the Simon Says Stamp (Wed) Challenge as ‘Anything Goes’.

 

AW Flower Pot V2

 

Materials:

  • The Rose Tree, Essence of Nature and Mackintosh Sentiments stamp sets (Chocolate Baroque)
  • 8 X 8 inch card blank, Kraft card, pink card (pearl or satin mirror), pearl card (brown), Crafty Individuals Background Paper (Shades of Summer) and white stamping card
  • Inkpads: Memento (London Fog), Versafine (Onyx Black), Distress Ink (Broken China)
  • Alcohol ink pens (pink, yellow, green, pale blue plus clear blender)
  • Watercolour pens (pale blue, yellow) and Spectrum Noir Sparkle Pen (Clear Overlay)
  • Fine tipped pen (opaque white, pink)
  • Stickles glitter glue (Crystal)
  • Flowersoft sprinkles (green, yellow)
  • Dies: Venetian Lace Layering set (Tonic), flower pot (Trimcraft Pots & Vases), Butterfly (Sizzix)

How it was done:

  1. Kraft card was trimmed and mounted onto the card front and faux stitching added with fine tipped pen.
  2. The lace mats were cut from pink card and decorative background paper glued in place. The butterfly was also cut from pink card. Sentiments were stamped with Distress Ink.
  3. The flower pot was cut from pearl brown card and lightly shaped before gluing with 3D glue gel.
  4. The flowers were stamped with Memento Ink and coloured with alcohol pens. The floral spray and individual flowers were cut out for decoupage, lightly shaped before gluing down using 3D glue gel. A little clar sparkle pen was brushed over the flowers for sparkle.
  5. The bumble bees were stamped with Versafine, coloured with watercolour pens and cut out.
  6. Yellow Flowersoft was glued into the flower centres, green onto some of the leaves and onto the foreground (to ‘ground’ the pots).
  7. Finished with touches of glitter glue for added sparkle.