Flower Girl Figurine Garden Sculpture with Powertex

This is my first attempt at a figurine. She took me a long time to finally get finished, having started her over a year ago at my Level 1 Powertex Tutor Training! Now that she is finally done I love my Flower Girl – and I call her ‘Bestower of Beauty’.

AW Flower Lady 1

She stands approx. 49cm high.

Materials used:

How it was done:

The body was shaped over the wooden pole using the card inner tube stuffed and wrapped with foil and covered with masking tape. The plaster head was taped onto the top.

T shirt yarn was then wound tightly around the torso and down to the base of the pole. I made a bit of a decorative wrap over the torso to create the dress bodice. The whole thing was then given a coat of Bronze Powertex, working it well into the fabric.

 

AW Flower Lady 2

Fabrics were then coated with Powertex and draped over the body to create the clothing. I used a knitted fabric (Stockinette) to create the illusion of arms by allowing the knit to curl around on itself to give dimension.

A small amount of Power Cotton was added to make small hair plaits draped over her shoulder, and fine lace added to make a headdress. Another piece of T shirt yarn was used to create a tie belt and helped to hold the skirt securely in place. The crochet skirt was draped down and over the base.

During the training course I started the dry brushing technique, mixing pigments into Easy Varnish, to add some colour and bring out the different textures. I used Bronze Colortricx to colour the face, shoulders and hair, plus to add colour around the base. Blue and green Powercolors were used (mixed with a little white) to dry brush and highlight clothing texture.

I was delighted with what I had achieved but came home with my figurine always intending to add more colour (you know how I LOVE colour) and floral embellishments to turn her into a gorgeous flower girl. Sadly she sat in the corner for around a year before I finally pulled her back onto my work bench!

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I began by adding much more colour, intense in places, to colour her clothing using the new colours from The Secret Art Loft. I tried to keep most of this colour to the top layers of texture so as to keep depth in the fabric folds. I also added more colour to her face and lips, plus a little shading over the eye lids.

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Flower and leaf embellishments were created using Art Stone mixed with Powertex to make a clay which was pressed into silicone moulds. When dry they were coloured with Secret Art Loft Pigments mixed with Easy Varnish and glued in place with Powertex. I also created a suggestion of arms and hands using Stone Art clay. The bad modelling was disguised by carefully placing the bouquet of flowers in her arms – ha ha.

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The flowers were also applied onto her dress and down around the base. More texture was added to the base by sprinkling 3D Sand & Balls into wet Powertex.

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I spiralled the flowers down and around the hem of her skirt.

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Here you can see lots of textures in her outfit, and pretty coloured flowers in her hair.

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Another view showing her back.

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She looks beautiful standing in the garden. Although she is weather proof I would definitely have to add extra weight (e.g. a concrete base) or add a small garden spike to the base, as she is very vulnerable to toppling over in the wind. I am going to be keeping her indoors so she will be ok as she is.

 

AW Unicorn and Lady 2

However, she does look gorgeous alongside my unicorn! I might change my mind and adapt the base for outdoors – sure that I have a bit of broken paving slab somewhere – that would do the trick.

I hope that you like my ‘Bestower of Beauty’.

Bye for now, Anne x.

Daisy Bowl created with Powertex

This was my first attempt at creating a 3D bowl with Powertex. I was really chuffed with the results.

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I recycled an old cotton scarf and used the lovely Daisy Moulds to create 3D embellishments from Stone Art clay.

 

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I also added some 3D Sand & Balls plus a few glass seed beads for more texture.

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Materials:

Egyptian Cards and a bit of experimentation with Powertex and stamps

Oh I just love the new stamps from Anna Hewlett (Rosehart Studio) and Powertex. They sold out in a flash on the Hochanda shows too. Here are a couple of my card samples created for the show.

 

AW Heiro Card

 

On this one I used the Hiero Heaven stamp. The background was stamped and embossed with clear or gold embossing powders onto the black card. The vintage papers were created by stamping and colouring with Distress Inks (Scattered Straw, Vintage Photo and Peeled Paint).

 

AW Scarab Card

 

 

On this one I created the background by stamping with black archival ink onto craft card and colouring with pencils (they gave a nice chalky effect).

I created the gold embellishments using a Soft Form Relief Paste (Pebeo). I inked the Hiero Heaven and Scarabella stamps with archival black ink, spread with the paste and left to dry for 48 hours before peeling away. Extra colour was added to my scarab using acrylic paint.

No Powertex in these but I did have a little play:

Experiments:

This soft form paste stays flexible when dry so it can be curved around 3D objects and can also be stitched into. Some of you may know me for my paper crafting and textile art, so this is something I keep in my stash.

I have since had an experiment with using Powertex onto my stamp and leaving that to dry. I did have a concern about using Powertex on my stamps at first. Not that it would harm the rubber but I like to mount my stamps onto foam mount for clean crisp stamping in my textile and paper crafting. I thought that the Powertex might seep into the foam and harden it up ruining the cushion. I did a couple of bench tests to try it out:

 

AW Powertex experiment 1

  • I inked up part of the Heiro Heaven panel with Archival Ink and poured on some Ivory Powertex. Immediately it started reacting strangely with the ink. The outer edges of the puddle started moving and swirling and lost their colour.
  • I also poured some Powertex onto a non-inked area (although there was a bit of residual dried ink on there).
  • I mixed in a little Stone Art into the Powertex, making a paste, and spread this onto an inked area. This was more controllable than pouring liquid and there was no strange reaction evident with the ink beneath.
  • I also poured some Powertex over one of the smaller stamps, deliberately spilling it over the sides and onto my foam mount.

Experiment results:

Similar to my usual texture paste it took 24-48 hours to dry fully. All the test pieces worked really well and peeled away from the stamp really easily. Residual dried on Powertex was easily removed with warm water and a nail brush. The embellishments are quite stiff but remained flexible enough to curve around if desired, particularly if warmed up in the hands or with a hair dryer.

 

AW Powertex experiment 2

The ink transferred really well giving a nice dark image into the embellishment crevices, even the one that seemed to have a strange reaction with the ink worked well.

The smaller stamp that I covered in Powertex also cleaned up easily and the Powertex pulled away from the mount foam ok too, although I had to pull it away gently as it hung onto the foam quite tightly.

If you use unmounted stamps then obviously there is no issue in covering them with Powertex. I would say that if like me, you like to foam mount your stamps, then I would recommend making a bit of a paste with Powertex plus Stone Art or 3D Sand and spread this over. It is much more controllable and you can keep it away from the edges and foam mount more easily.

I hope that my experiments help with your own creative play.